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Live from London: Parinda Joshi

What happens when a twenty one-year-old from college gets on the stage of 'Britain’s Got Talent?' Parinda Joshi talks about her book 'Live from London.'

Congress Party general secretary Rahul Gandhi
  Parinda Joshi lives in Bay Area and works in the entertainment industry in Los Angeles. Traveling tops her wish list and her favorite pastime is people watching.

It all started one morning in May two years ago. A dream woke Parinda Joshi up and all she could remember was reading a book she had written. A few months back, Bay Area based Parinda Joshi’s debut novel, Live from London, was released by a reputed publishing house in India. The book is available online in the United States.

The novel follows the life of a young Indian girl against the backdrop of the British music industry and is based in London and Mumbai. “I fondly refer to it as divine intervention. The idea of it was so fascinating that I started a blog just to self-learn how to funnel my thoughts,” says Joshi.

“I simultaneously started writing a novel and five months later, I had a finished product. The process initially was more about testing my limits than any ulterior motive like getting published but fortunately it all fell into place,” Joshi, who works in the field of analytics in the entertainment industry in Los Angeles, said.

Born and raised in Ahmedabad, India, Joshi got married to a management consultant and moved to the U.S. a decade ago. “My upbringing has been in India so it’s only natural that I have a predisposition towards Indian characters and stories. The fun thing about this day and age we live in is that most of us have global identities. We’re raised somewhere, work somewhere else and travel a whole lot. My protagonist is one such girl,” she explains. The novel follows Nishi’s journey as she attempts to carve out a space for herself in the big bad world of music.

“Live from London is a fast-paced entertaining read with contemporary plots, a mix of Indian and British characters and is based in London and Mumbai. Professions that haven’t been the norm in India have had a huge appeal factor in the recent past. A career in music is one such profession. With the influx of reality music shows, a huge number of young adults find themselves fantasizing about being a pop star. The main character of this story, Nishi Gupta, is one such girl: talented and ambitious,” Joshi adds about the plot.

“Nishi’s character will resonate well with youngsters,” Joshi says. “She symbolizes the beginning of a new trend where Indians who had settled abroad are reversing the migration process to chase their dreams in a new India. The novel also has liberal doses of humor and romance and takes you on wild journey through Nishi’s life.”

On a closing note, Joshi adds, “Once I discovered writing, I found it to be immensely satisfying and very liberating. It’s like any other art form. It provides that delicate balance to the chaotic and stressful urban life that we inadvertently sign up for.”

Live from London. What happens when fate forklifts a fun and fearless twenty one-year-old from a crazy college costume party and puts her straight onto the stage of Britain’s Got Talent?

Nishi Gupta lives in London, loves playing her red beauty (guitar) and has a knack of seamlessly landing up in dicey situations. Unable to battle her humiliation post a stage debacle, she interns at a record label company. There she meets Mr. Fredrick, the godfather she was looking for; influential and hard to impress. Instead, she finds herself attracted to an international recording artist with a slightly funny name, Nick Navjot Chapman, who is part Indian, part Canadian and entirely sexy.

A short steamy affair, a gig on Nick’s debut album and a ticket to stardom; life changes fast for Nishi. Then the unthinkable happens and she finds herself back in India trying to build a fresh life in a country she vaguely remembers. Will she be able to move on forgetting her past, or are there more surprises waiting for her?

More about her book at parindajoshi.com


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Embracing Solar:
India’s New Energy Frontier
India is all set to emerge as a major solar power generator. The impact of solar power generation is going to be felt the most in rural belts that remain outside the national power supply grid, writes Siddharth Srivastava.

Faster Green Card?
High-Skilled Immigration Act
Individuals from India and China who are in high-skilled jobs in the U.S. have to wait up to 10 years for a green card, all that could change soon, writes attorney Mahesh Bajoria.

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EDITORIAL: Embracing Solar
SUBCONTINENT: India’s Missile Program
FASHION: Dipti Irla’s Collection Debut
PEOPLE: San Francisco's New Consul General of India Meets the Community
COMMUNITY: News in Brief
BUSINESS: Kingfisher in a Tailspin
PEOPLE: Live from London
TRAVEL: Hot Springs Romance
RECIPE: Chicken Kofta
AUTO REVIEW: 2011 Ford Fusion Hybrid
REMEMBRANCE: Dev Anand (1923-2011)
BOLLYWOOD: Film Review: Desi Boyz

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